The Body Beneath
By: J.R. McNamara on September 5, 2005  |  Comments  |  Bookmark and Share
DVD
Siren Visual Entertainment (Australia). All Regions, PAL. 4:3. English DD 2.0. 82 minutes
The Movie
Credits
Director: Andy Milligan
Starring:Gavin Reed, Jackie Skarvellis, Berwick Kaler, Susan Heard
Screenplay: Andy Milligan
Country: USA
Year: 1970
AKA: Vampire's Thirst
Probably known best for such horror and exploitation titles as The Rats are Coming! The Werewolves Are Here! and Fleshpot on 42nd St., the late Andy Milligan, who died in 1991 of AIDS, was described as 'the only director worse than Ed Wood'. Whilst that may be an exaggeration, Milligan's films are incredibly low budget, but the sense of 'camp' within them makes them somehow humorous…and ominous. Milligan, a navy brat and dress-maker who ran the clothes shop Ad Lib in New York during the 50s, dabbled in stage productions until he finally made his first feature in 1965, a gay short film called The Vapors. From this humble beginning, he teamed up with producer William Mishkin, and together they made 11 features, sordid morality stories where the nasty antagonists are always faced with their come-uppances, which were often violent. In the late 60s, he moved to London where he made his exploitation horror flicks, including this feature, The Body Beneath also known as Vampire's Thirst.

The Reverend Alexander Algernon Ford (Gavin Reed), an ancient vampire, who resides in Carfax Abbey, near Highgate Cemetary, close to three of his female descendents, requires the womb of one of his relatives. The lucky one being Susan (Jackie Skarvellis), to return the bloodline of the Ford family to its former glory by having her mate with strong fresh blood and give birth to immortal vampire babies. Assisted by his quiet wife, Alicia (Susan Heard), his hunchbacked Beatle-haired assistant Spool (Berwick Kaler) and a trio of green faced ghouls, the good reverend goes about organizing a vampire feast where their future is to be decided.

Clearly gay and proud, Andy Milligan's life as been described as more bizarre than his movies, for example, to celebrate his marriage (yes, marriage) to one of his actresses, Candy Hammond, he cruised gay bars on Staten Island. Milligan's movies, all filmed on left over film stock with a 16mm Auricon camera, are handheld horrors where ethics are thrown out the window. His flowing camera style crosses the line from claustrophobic and moody to occasionally downright annoying. His scripts, all inspired by great works (this one clearly being Dracula), are contrived but still acted quite well in a vaudevillian sense. Another note of interest with Milligan's movies is that the more ornate costumes were made by himself under his alias Raffine. Watching this movie makes one feel as though they are watching a Hammer movie, filmed with a Carnival of Souls budget.

Video
The quality of the video is to be expected with many pops and scratches, but the colors are vibrant and the picture, for the most part, is surprisingly clear although during the dream-like feast it becomes quite muddy. Obviously, The Body Beneath is not a digitally re-mastered extravaganza.
Audio
Recorded in unspectacular Dolby Digital Stereo, the amusing thing about the soundtrack is the fact that in most scenes you can hear the camera running in the background.
Extra Features

The Gallery of Exploitation Art is a great 6 minute 10 second montage of movie posters with a radio commercial soundtrack. Posters from films such as The Peeping Phantom, Fanny Hill Meets Dr Erotico and others are accompanied by radio commercials for The Female Butcher, The Girl Snatcher and companions of their ilk.

Trailers for Milligan's films The Body Beneath, Guru the Mad Monk and The Vapors, which describes him as 'the New Leader in Underground Filmmaking'.

The surprise on this disc is Milligan's first short film, The Vapors. Running at 32 minutes and 20 seconds, the Vapors takes place in a gay bath house, where a young gay man meets an older married man, and they talk. Milligan's epileptic camera work is particularly effective here, although the drama of the main part of the story is undercut by Benny Hill-ish queans over acting the gay stereotype with silly segues. Filmed in Black and white, The Vapors is a surprisingly moving tale.

The Verdict
Camper than a row of tents, The Body Beneath somehow entertains, and proves that Milligan was no hack, but had an inimitable style. Not a movie for big budget blockbuster lovers, but with the vampires, cannibalism and immolation, fans of trash cinema will have a ball.
Movie Score
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