The Spirit (2008)
By: J.R. McNamara on June 28, 2010  | 
DVD
Sony | Region B | 2.40:1, 1080p | English DTS HD Master Audio 7.1 | 103 minutes (Full Specs)
The Movie
Cover Art
Credits
Director: Frank Miller
Starring: Gabriel Macht, Samuel L. Jackson, Eva Mendes, Scarlett Johansson, Dan Lauria
Screenplay: Frank Miller
Country: USA
External Links
IMDB Purchase YouTube
While many comic's fans may have never read The Spirit, they would at the very least be aware of the legend of comics craftsman Will Eisner. Eisner's abilities with a comics board and the visuals that he displayed upon them are legendary and surpassed by no-one. His skill in relating a story in drawn visuals has influenced many, MANY cartoonists and filmmakers alike. His name is synonymous with the craft of comic writing and drawing, that the comic's version of The Academy Awards is known as The Eisners.

Frank Millar is one of those people who was greatly influenced by Eisner. Not so much from an artistic point of view, but more the way Eisner treated the images and 'spirit' of the city the characters resided in as a character as well, and his want of having the main character's relationships with women being volatile and good guy/ bad guy barrier blurring. Take a look at Millar's Elektra Saga from Daredevil and you will see what I mean.

Millar's understanding of Eisner's work and friendship with the man made him the perfect person to write and direct a film based on this character.

The Spirit tells of.. The Spirit (Gabriel Macht), a no-nonsense, two fisted, supposedly ex-cop who is seemingly unstoppable. He spends his days residing in his crypt, but at night defends his city from those who choose to abuse her and her citizens. One of those abusers is a crime boss known as The Octopus (Samuel L. Jackson), another unstoppable soul who seems to have a 'spiritual' relationship with the Spirit.

While in pursuit of a treasure of great importance to an experiment he is performing, The Octopus, with his scientist partner Silken Floss (Scarlett Johansson) and her cloned lackeys (all played by Louis Lombardi) crosses paths with The Spirit's old flame and professional thief Sand Serif (Eva Mendes) who is tracking down a treasure of her own. Of course they end up with each other's objective, and then the fun really begins.

Does The Octopus' experiment have anything to do with The Spirit, and if so will it be his undoing?

Frank Miller has made a stylish film that is full of classic noir imagery, and scenes reminiscent of many classic directors work, such as Alfred Hitchcock, Stanley Kubrick and Robert Aldrich; sometimes deliberate, and sometimes just to this viewer's eye. The over the top performances he gets from Samuel L. Jackson and Gabriel Macht are totally cartoony, but are brought down to earth by the absolute gravity of Dan Lauria. His ability to get actors to act at their peaks is apparent as well, even Eva Mendes, who I occasionally find lacking in ability (though she makes up for it visually) really exceeds any role she has previously played.

Speaking of babes, Miller has scored some spectacular woman to play the menagerie of femme fatales from The Spirit comic, even though the character of Sand Serif was somewhat merged with the absent P'Gell. The afore mentioned Mendes is at her absolute sexiest as Serif, and her competition here are other gorgeous actresses such as Scarlett Johansson, Paz Vega, Jaime King, Sarah Paulson, Stana Katic and newcomer Seychelle Gabriel, all of whom really steal any scene they are in. A special mention for exploitation fans must be Scarlett Johansson dressed as a Nazi.

The combination of P'Gell and Sand Serif is not the only liberty Miller has taken with Eisner's comic. The comic never revealed The Octopus as anything other than a pair of gloves, so his decision to show the Octopus in full is as brave as Judge Dredd taking off his helmet or making Aliens Vs Predator films suck. He also dumped the idea of the Spirit's sidekick 'Ebony White' who was one of those now unacceptable Negro characters; you know the ones, big lipped 'Yes Massa' types.

The end credits are cool. From a visual point of view they show a series of Miller's storyboards with the credits over them, and from a soundtrack point of view, Christina Aguilera does a cover of Marlene Deitrich's Falling in Love Again, which she sang in The Blue Angel in 1930.
Video
The film is presented in 2.40:1 widescreen and is an amazingly detailed image: a credit to bluray.
Audio
The soundtrack on this is spectacular and will take full advantage of your sound system. Presented in DTS-HD 7.1.
Extra Features
Commentary with director Frank Miller and producer Deborah Del Prete. It's an excellent commentary, which the two performers exposing themselves as lovers of comics, film, each others work, and of the film they created together. They do occasionally talk about re-doing excised effects for the DVD (and Blu-ray I imagine) but judging by the fact that they are not there, I assume it never happened.

The Green Room is more or less a traditional 'making of' type extra. It covers the origins of the film, Will Eisner's and Frank Miller's artwork, how actors reacted to the green screen aspects of the filming and the special effects. It's fairly brief for what it has to cover, but covers a lot!

Miller on Miller is a queer little feature which has Miller himself recounting tales of his life and career, looking at his work on Daredevil and The Dark Knight and others, and his love of city based characters. He also takes a very brief look at the history of comics, and the career of Will Eisner. For Miller fans it is a decent feature, though he does recount tales that he previously discussed on the extras for Daredevil and Elektra, and those not familiar with Miller should find it even more interesting. What I found interesting about it though was his decision to dress like Freddy Krueger for the interview.

Alternate Ending with Voiceover by Gabriel Macht and Samuel L. Jackson is an animated storyboard, but with dialogue spoken by the actors.

History Repeats is an excellent look at Eisner's creation of The Spirit, with interviews with some of my personal heroes like Denis Kitchen and Neal Adams, and how he changed the world's appreciation of comics.

We also have the theatrical trailer.
The Verdict
Movie Score
Disc Score
Overall Score
The film looks great, but unfortunately suffers from two big problems. The first is that the story is choppy, and the film feels like it has no flow; the term 'Mad Woman's breakfast' comes to mind, which is a shame as the story is a good and fun one. The second problem is its identity. It looks so much like Sin City that the whole film feels like a cut sequence from that film. Enjoyable, but flawed.

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